The guys you’re about to meet are humans just like us, but they’ll deal with crimes using criteria for judgment different from yours. Their actions sometimes may be beyond your comprehension. Trust them, but at the same time, be cautious of them. If you underestimate them you’ll get seriously hurt. They’re what we call “Enforcers.” They’ll be your subordinates.

(Source: annie--s, via yakfrost)

avianawareness:

I got my adorable budgie pouch from here. Eriko from Japan is a sweetness with a shop full of adorbs. 

Shipping isn’t too bad. It gets here surprisingly quick and not TOO horrible of a price. Japan has the cutest birdy things.

(via rock-bomber)

zooophagous:

kaleighbytheway:

zooophagous:

antelopesaplenty:

chiru, or tibetan antelope, attempting to graze through the snow-covered ground {source unavailable}

Fun fact: It’s guessed that the horns of the Chiru played a part in some of the earliest unicorn legends. When viewed in profile from a distance, it can look like they’ve only got one.

I was just watching a show about the origins of unicorns, part of the main theory is a simple one, it was a translation issue. When they were first translating the bible from Hebrew to Greek they were faced with an animal that was already extinct, that they had no description of, so they loosely described a rhino (they were in Egypt), and named it in greek. That then was translated to Latin, and became unicornis. The description of the animal was slowly altered over time until we have what we now picture as a unicorn.

I’ve heard similar stories about why mentions of the “unicorn” were taken out of the King James Bible when it was translated for NIV. Apparently, ‘unicorn’ is meant to describe ANY animal shown with a single horn, and it’s estimated that the original text was referring to stone relief carvings of bulls viewed in profile- with only one horn showing. Still, more traditional descriptions of ‘unicorns’ from ancient Greece also exist, describing a wild ass with a red head, a single red-and-white-and-black spiraled horn, “foot bones” like an ox and a tufted tail like a lion. Obviously, such creatures do not and likely have never existed, but then fanciful descriptions of far-away places weren’t uncommon back then, when such things were a lot harder to fact check.

zooophagous:

kaleighbytheway:

zooophagous:

antelopesaplenty:

chiru, or tibetan antelope, attempting to graze through the snow-covered ground {source unavailable}

Fun fact: It’s guessed that the horns of the Chiru played a part in some of the earliest unicorn legends. When viewed in profile from a distance, it can look like they’ve only got one.

I was just watching a show about the origins of unicorns, part of the main theory is a simple one, it was a translation issue. When they were first translating the bible from Hebrew to Greek they were faced with an animal that was already extinct, that they had no description of, so they loosely described a rhino (they were in Egypt), and named it in greek. That then was translated to Latin, and became unicornis. The description of the animal was slowly altered over time until we have what we now picture as a unicorn.

I’ve heard similar stories about why mentions of the “unicorn” were taken out of the King James Bible when it was translated for NIV. Apparently, ‘unicorn’ is meant to describe ANY animal shown with a single horn, and it’s estimated that the original text was referring to stone relief carvings of bulls viewed in profile- with only one horn showing.

Still, more traditional descriptions of ‘unicorns’ from ancient Greece also exist, describing a wild ass with a red head, a single red-and-white-and-black spiraled horn, “foot bones” like an ox and a tufted tail like a lion. Obviously, such creatures do not and likely have never existed, but then fanciful descriptions of far-away places weren’t uncommon back then, when such things were a lot harder to fact check.